NATHAN - Utility of Natural History Information

Important:

These original OMOP resources are no longer supported. You can find the latest developments by visiting the OHDSI libraries.


The natural history report is a standardized summary of information about populations of interest. Natural history information is descriptive, with the intent to provide some context and expected rates of drug utilization and condition occurrence to facilitate the interpretation of benefit and risk information. Observational data offers potential value in providing summary information, both about the populations that experience a condition (the disease natural history) as well as the populations that are exposed (natural history of drug utilization). OMOP has developed the Natural History Analysis program, NATHAN, that produces a standardized report to summarize characteristics about the population of interest, including demographic factors (age and gender), co-morbidities and concomitant medications, and health service utilization prior to, during, and after the event onset.

Download NATHAN Specification and SAS Code:
OMOP NATHAN Specification, Code and Release Notes

The Observational Source Characteristics Analysis Report (OSCAR) provides a systematic approach for summarizing all data within the OMOP common data model. NATHAN is an extension of OSCAR, where data characteristics can be produced for a particular subpopulation of interest. When OSCAR is used on a data source, the following questions are addressed for all patients represented in the data:

• “How many patients were exposed to a particular drug?’
• “What is the average number of drug exposure records that comprise a drug era?”
• “What is the median age at time of diagnosis?
• “What is the largest number of condition occurrences for a given person?”
• “What is the median length of a drug era?”
• “What is the maximum time a person was observed within the database?”
• “On average, how many visits does each person have recorded?”
• “What is the distribution of age at the start of a drug therapy?”

When using NATHAN, the same questions can be answered for subgroups of patients. For example, “For patients with an MI, how many had an exposure to a particular drug?” NATHAN takes this a step further and provides some temporal association. From the first MI, NATHAN can address:

• “For patients with an MI, how many had an exposure to a particular drug in the previous 30 days?”
• “For patients with an MI, how many had an exposure to a particular drug in the previous 6 months?”
• “For patients with an MI, how many had an exposure to a particular drug in the previous 1 year?”
• “For patients with an MI, how many had an exposure to a particular drug at any time in the patients observed history?”